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Sunday, April 19, 2020 | History

4 edition of Phoenician bronze and silver bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean found in the catalog.

Phoenician bronze and silver bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean

Glenn Markoe

Phoenician bronze and silver bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean

  • 309 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by University of California Press in Berkeley, London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bronze bowls, Phoenician -- Cyprus.,
  • Silver bowls, Phoenician -- Cyprus.,
  • Bronze bowls, Phoenician -- Mediterranean Region.,
  • Silver bowls, Phoenician -- Mediterranean Region.,
  • Phoenicians.,
  • Cyprus -- Antiquities, Phoenician.,
  • Mediterranean Region -- Antiquities, Phoenician.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementGlenn Markoe.
    SeriesUniversity of California publications in classical studies -- 26
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDS54.3
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22305852M
    ISBN 100520096630


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Phoenician bronze and silver bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean by Glenn Markoe Download PDF EPUB FB2

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Phoenician Bronze and Silver Bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean (University of California Publications in Classical Studies)Cited by:   The Paperback of the Phoenician Bronze and Silver Bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean by Glenn Markoe at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or B&N Outlet Membership Educators Gift Cards Stores & Events HelpAuthor: Glenn Markoe.

Get this from a library. Phoenician bronze and silver bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean. [Glenn Markoe]. Add tags for "Phoenician bronze and silver bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean".

Be the first. phoenician bronze and silver bowls from cyprus and the mediterranean. university of california press.

XII, p., bild. Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. This is a first collective book about the topic of Bronzework in the Phoenician-Punic world and its social, historical and cultural implications. The work brings together a score of prestigious specialists from several universities and research.

24 Phoenician sumptuous objects had a widespread diffusion with all Mediterranean elites, in this particular instance in its oriental area, in the chronological span already identified, and in particular in Cyprus, as shown by the example of the so-called Cypro-Phoenician bowls (Markoe ), which constitute the most evident manifestation of Author: Pavlos Flourentzos, Maria Luisa Vitobello.

Phoenician bronzes in Mediterranean / edited by Javier Jiménez Ávila. – Madrid: Real Academia de la Los cuencos decorados fenicios o “Phoenician bowls” Phoenician bronze candelabra. The research project “The Silver Coinage of the Kings of Cyprus: Numismatics and History in the Archaic and Classical Periods (6th to 4th centuries BC) (SilCoinCy)” is conducted at the Institute of Historical Research (IHR), National Hellenic Research Foundation (NHRF), Athens, Greece and during the period January - October it has been funded by the Action ARISTEIA II.

THE PHOENICIANS AND THE WEST Politics, Colonies and Trade second edition This is an updated and expanded version of Maria Eugenia Aubet’s highly praised book, The Phoenicians and the West, first published in English in Phoenician bronze and silver bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean.

Responsibility by Glenn Markoe. Imprint Berkeley: University of California Press, c Phoenician > Cyprus. Silver bowls, Phoenician > Cyprus.

Bronze bowls, Phoenician > Mediterranean Region. Silver bowls, Phoenician > Mediterranean Region. Phoenician Bronze and Silver Bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean. Series: University of California Publications: Classical Studies Berkeley, CA: University of California. The Emergence of Phoenician Art.

Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research Moscati, S. The World of the Phoenicians. Imai, A., Some Aspects of “Phoenician Bowls”, with Special Reference to the Proto-Cypriote Class and the Cypro-Phoenician Class, New York.

Layard, A. H., Monuments of Nineveh. Including Bas-Reliefs from the Palace of Sennacherib and Bronzes from Nimrud, from Drawings Made on the Spot during a Second Expedition to Assyria. If you are interested in the Phoenician's and the area of the Ancient Mediterranean as a whole, you will probably find this book interesting at the very least.

I haven't been able to find anything quite as comprehensive as this, in regards to the Phoenician's, and will continue to reference it/5. the Phoenician cities first emerged as urban entities around B.C. As Egyptian and Near Eastern documents record, the Late Bronze Age (ca.

– B.C.) was a time of economic prosperity for these trading centers. Confined to a narrow coastal strip with limited agricultural resources, maritime trade was a natural development. With the. Phoenician bronze and silver bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean (University of California Classical Studies 26).

Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. The Phoenicians Paperback – February 5, by Sabatino Moscati (Author) out of 5 stars 7 ratingsCited by: Phoenician sumptuous objects had a widespread diffusion with all the Mediterranean élites, in this particular instance in its oriental area, in the chronological span already identified, and in particular in Cyprus, as shown in the so-called Cypro-Phoenician bowls (Markoe, ) which constitute the most evident manifestation of such an.

G.E. Markoe, Phoenician Bronze and Silver bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean, Berkeley, These bowls have been found in Cyprus, and a large number in sites in Italy, the Aegean and the Near East.

It has been suggested that this particular example was produced by a Phoenician craftsman working in Etruria. Unlike other works that have treated the Phoenician culture as an Early Iron Age phenomenon, Markoe focuses on the continuity in tradition that characterized Phoenician history over a period of more than years, from the beginning of the Late Bronze Age (c b.c.)--when Phoenician cities first emerged--to the start of the Hellenistic /5(2).

A Cypriot Silver Bowl Reconsidered I. The Iconography of the Decoration VASSOS KARAGEORGHIS Foundation Anastasios G. Leventis, Cyprus T HE CESNOLA COLLECTION in The Met- ropolitan Museum of Art encompasses by far the single richest body of decorated metal bowls from ancient Cyprus, often referred to as "Cypro-Phoenician.".

Silver bowl from Amathus in Cyprus, 8th – 7th century BC, now in the British Museum. The decoration shows an extraordinary blend of styles.

The outermost frieze shows to the right Assyrian archers and Greek soldiers with their round hoplite shields attacking a city, while to the left, Egyptian soldiers climb ladders up the walls and other Egyptians cut down trees with Aegean double : Andrew Selkirk.

Coordinates. Phoenicia (/ f ə ˈ n ɪ ʃ ə /; from Ancient Greek: Φοινίκη, Phoiníkē) was an ancient Semitic-speaking thalassocratic civilization that originated in the Levant region of the eastern Mediterranean, specifically Lebanon, west of the Fertile Crescent.

It was concentrated along the coast of modern Lebanon and included parts of which are now coastal Syria and northern Capital: Byblos (– BC), Tyre (– BC). Metal bowls with embossed and engraved designs of a central medallion and concentric bands were produced by skilled Cypro-Phoenician craftsmen in bronze, silver, and gold.

The Phoenicians were skilled artisans noted for their fine crafts, often "borrowing" a basic idea or technology and improving on it. Early Cyprus: Crossroads of the Mediterranean. Los Angeles, California: J. Paul Getty Museum. Iacovou, Maria.

"The Late Bronze Age Origins of Cypriot Hellenism and the Establishment of the Iron Age Kingdoms." From Ishtar to Aphrodite: years of Cypriot Hellenism, Treasures from the Museums of Cyprus pp. fig. The Phoenician sarcophagus discovered in and illustrated in Abela’s Della descrittione di Malta ( ).

[27] Representations of two metal bowls found inside a tomb in Cerveteri reproduced as tavola x in Grifi’s Monumenti di Cere antica ().

[31] The silver bowl found in the necropolis at Palestrina in asFile Size: KB. Phoenician bronze and silver bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean 3 copies; Phoenicians, The 1 copy; Animal style on Greek and Etruscan vases: an exhibition at the Robert 1 copy; The Phoenicians (Peoples of the Past) 1 copy.

The extent of the Phoenician Civilization at the time of the Macedonian conquest of the Eastern Mediterranean In the political and military void of the ensuing year ancient Dark Age that began c. BCE, a small group of Phoenician traders from the Levant prospered and gradually expanded their influence across the Mediterranean.

A Cypriot Silver Bowl Reconsidered 2. The Technique and Physical History of the Bowl culture, notably, worked metal bowls of bronze, sil- regarding metalwork in the eastern Mediterranean. However, Phoenician craft activities have been nei- ther identified nor adequately understood in their own homeland, since so little has been.

Glenn E. Markoe, Phoenician Bronze and Silver Bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean (Berkeley: University of California Press, ): Glenn E. Markoe "The Emergence of Orientalizing in Greek Art": 53, 54, A tomb at Teke near Knossos contained Late Protogeometric Attic pottery as well as Cypriot style bowl with a Phoenician inscription.

Phoenicia was an ancient civilization composed of independent city-states located along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea stretching through what is now Syria, Lebanon and northern Phoenicians were a great maritime people, known for their mighty ships adorned with horses’ heads in honor of their god of the sea, Yamm, the brother of Mot, the god of : Joshua J.

Mark. Markoe, G. Phoenician bronze and silver bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean, found: Web. 3: p. (a round hollow vessel usually nearly hemispherical in form and generally deeper than a basin and larger or heavier than a cup).

Cyprus gained independence after BC following the death of Ashurbanipal, the last great Assyrian ries from this period are chiefly rock-cut tombs.

They have been found, among other locations, at Tamassos, Soloi, Patriki and rock-cut 'Royal' tombs at Tamassos, built in about BC, imitate wooden pillars show Phoenician influence. Publications: Phoenician Bronze and Silver Bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean, ; (ed.

and contrib.) Mistress of the House, Mistress of Heaven: Women in Ancient Egypt, ; Phoenicians, Author of exhibition catalogs and museum guides.

Between the eighth and sixth centuries BC, the Phoenicians established the first trading system in the Mediterranean basin, from their homeland, in what is now Lebanon, to colonies in Cyprus, Tunisia, Sicily, Sardinia and southern Spain.

The Phoenician state was able to maintain its independence, despite the territorial expansion of the Assyrians, in return for tribute provided by its /5(2).

(1*). With the Phoenician cultural expan-sion into the Mediterranean, depictions of M. spread to the west with reported finds on Cyprus and in Spain (2*-4). Somewhat indeterminate representations of M. come from Phoenician sites in the Mediterranean, such as Carthage, Sardinia, Ibiza, Italy, and Spain.

Those along the Phoenician coastFile Size: 96KB. Winter, Irene. Review of Glenn Markoe, Phoenician Bronze and Silver Bowls from Cyprus and the Mediterranean. Gnomon [Please note: Some non-Latin characters were omitted from this article].

Phoenician bronze and silver bowls were costly objects that have been found in Cyprus, Athens, Olympia, Delphi, southern Italy, Praeneste, and Etruria (Burkert ). Many of these bowls provide archaeological evidence of trade with the Phoenicians because at least three of these bowls are in fact of Phoenician origin because the ones.

The Phoenician civilization may be lost to time, but the genetic legacy of these ancient seafarers lives on today. National Geographic’s Chris Tyler Smith tested the DNA of 1, men from Phoenician hubs of Syria, Palestine, Tunisia, Cyprus, and Morocco.

- Inscribed bronze Phoenician bowl from the sanctuary of Zeus at Olympia. B.C. Tartessos (Greek: Ταρτησσός) or Tartessus, was a semi-mythical harbor city and the surrounding culture on the south coast of the Iberian Peninsula (in modern Andalusia, Spain), at the mouth of the Guadalquivir River.

It appears in sources from Greece and the Near East starting during the first millennium BC. Herodotus, for example, describes it as beyond the Pillars of Heracles.

This detail from one of the bronze bands holding together the leaves of the monumental door leading into the temple of the dream-god Mamu at Imgur-Ellil (modern Balawat) shows the king and queen of Tyre at the shore of their island city seeing off boats with tribute and gifts for Shalmaneser III of Assyria ( BC).Phoenicians ~~ Phoenicia ~~ Greek Phoenicia, Roman Phoenicia Phoenicia map.

Phoenicia lived its longest life under the Phoenicians, the ancient people whose name was given to this land we know today as Lebanon. After the conquest of Phoenicia by Alexander the Great in BC, it took on new life as Greek-dominated Phoenicia.